Griffith Stadium Home Runs

griffith stadium aerialMost of those familiar with baseball history know that cavernous Griffith Stadium, home of the original Washington American League team from its opening until 1960 and to the expansion Senators in 1961, was a difficult place to hit a ball out of the park. That was especially true before Calvin Griffith moved the fences in after his uncle and adoptive father, Clark Griffith, died in October 1955.
Just how difficult? Astounding by today’s standards, in four different seasons — 1915, 1917, 1918 and 1945 — no Washington player hit a ball out of the park for a home run. In 1920, 1924 and 1926, just one out-of-the-park homer was hit each season by the home team. In 1919 and 1923, two Washington players cleared the fence.
From 1915 through 1955, Griffith Stadium ranked no. 1 as the hardest A.L. park to hit a home run (even including inside-the-park homers, of which there were many) for either the home team, the visiting team or both every year except 1921, 1927 and 1954.
For 21 consecutive seasons, 1933 to 1953, it was the hardest A.L. park for both the home team and the visitors to hit homers. (The 1932 total was one more than Chicago, or it would be 22 straight)
For 35 seasons over 45 years, Griffith Stadium yielded the fewest homers of any A.L. ball park.
Goose Goslin hit all 17 of his 1926 home runs on the road, the highest total ever for a player who didn’t homer in his home park. Third on the list is Eddie Yost of the 1952 Senators, who hit all 12 of his homers away from Griffith Stadium.
In the stadium’s second and third seasons, when it seemed to yield a greater number of home runs, more than half of them were inside-the-park. In 1912, nine of Washington’s 13 HRs were inside-the-park (and another bounced over the fence for a HR under the rules of the day). Eight of the 12 hit by opponents did not clear the fences. Six of the nine Washington HRs and 13 of the 29 hit by the opposition in 1913 were inside-the-park.
In Washington’s lone World Championship season, 1924, the team’s only home run at Griffith Stadium was hit on Aug. 19 by Goose Goslin. In 1945, when the team finished in second place, 1.5 games behind Detroit, no Washington player hit a ball that cleared the fences at home. The lone Griffith stadium HR by the home team was an inside-the-parker by Joe Kuhel and that didn’t come until Sept. 7.
Washington lead the league in home runs on the road just once during the Clark Griffith era: In 1949, the Nationals hit 61 away from Griffith Stadium, but just 20 at home (2 inside the park). The pennant winning 1925 team finished second in road homers with 43, but hit just 13 at home – three of them being inside the park.

A version of this appeared in Nats News, the newsletter of the Washington Baseball Historical Society, by me.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s